Emotional Intelligence: Social Management

Social Management

Fourth Step in Developing Emotional Intelligence: Social Management / Relationship Management

The fourth and final step in developing emotional intelligence is social/relationship management. Before learning about social management, you must first understand:

  • How to see yourself clearly through self-awareness,
  • How to control your actions and emotions through self-management, and
  • How to recognize and understand the emotions of others through social awareness.

What is social management?

Social management is also known as relationship management. Social management and relationship management are used interchangeably in this blog to refer to the same skill. Effective social management allows you to connect with others while helping them feel supported and understood. You must master social management to be a highly effective leader with the power to lead change.

 

Social management is more than being a friendly and approachable leader. You must inspire and influence others strategically with the power to resolve conflicts as they arise. Effective social relationship management combines self-awareness, self-management, and social awareness to understand the causes and effects of social situations.

The four parts of effective social management

Effective social relationship management is when you decide how to best interact with others to achieve the outcome to best suit your needs (or the needs of others). This process can be divided into four parts: decision, interaction, outcome, and need.

  1. Decision. Your decision is based on the best course of action in a particular situation. To understand why others feel the way they do, your decision should be driven by research. Decide the best course of action based on the possible interactions and reactions that may occur.
  2. Interaction. The interaction refers to how you will behave in a particular situation. Interactions are based on research, such as previous interactions with other people or social groups.
  3. Outcome. The outcome refers to what you want to achieve through your interactions.
  4. Need. Your need (or the needs of others) will guide the outcome. In the workplace, it can refer to personal or business needs.

 

How to improve relationship management

Continue to refine and develop your emotional intelligence

Do not be afraid to go back to the basics and be a lifelong learner. You can improve your relationship management by continuing to work on the first three steps of developing emotional intelligence. Your self-awareness, self-management, and social awareness have unlimited potential.

Be a catalyst for change

The Dalai Lama said, “All sentient beings possess awareness, but among them, human beings possess great intelligence. Subject to a constant stream of positive and negative thoughts and emotions, what distinguishes us as human beings is that we are capable of positive change.”

 

As a leader, you must be a catalyst for change and understand how you can support the process of positive change. Communicate why change is needed and help others embrace it by being a supporter of the process every step of the way. 

Hypnotherapy

Hypnotism can be a powerful tool to improve your social relationship management. Hypnosis can encourage you to foster powerful connections with others. Through my body-centered hypnotherapy, I can help you gain the confidence you need to manage your personal and professional relationships.

Develop higher emotional intelligence with the help of Marcie Walker

I can help you develop higher emotional intelligence by helping you advance your self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and social management skills. I focus on holistic wellness through brain-based coaching and body-centered hypnotherapy using the 5-Step PAUSE Model. Contact me for more information about how I can help you develop higher emotional intelligence through hypnotherapy and executive coaching.

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